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Ukraine sinks another Russia’s warship in Crimea

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Destroyed Russian Warship in Crimea

Ukraine claimed that it has sunk another Russian warship using a sea drone attack on Wednesday.

According to Ukrainian authorities, the attack took place off the coast of Crimea, casting a gloom on the prowess of Russian naval fleet.

The attack was reportedly conducted by Group 13 special forces in cooperation with security and defence forces.

With the recent naval conflict between Ukraine and Russia in the Black Sea, Ukraine claims to have sunk three Russian warships.

The affected warships include the flagship Moskva, with its Neptune missiles and sea drones.

Russia, however, denied any missile attack and says the ships were damaged by internal explosions and bad weather.

Ukraine says that its strikes on Crimea and Russian ships are intended to isolate the peninsula and make it more difficult for Russia to sustain its military operations on the Ukrainian mainland.

Officials of the United State, meanwhile, have reportedly backed the Ukrainian version of events.

The situation is tense and volatile, as both sides have exchanged air attacks and accused each other of violating the Minsk agreements.

According to Ukrainian military intelligence agency, ‘MAGURA” V5 drones attacked Russia’s landing ship Caesar Kunikov and punctured holes on vessel.

The holes led to the sinking of the Russian warship.

Ukraine’s armed forces told CNN after the attack: “Ukraine has disabled a third of the Russian Black Sea Fleet during the large-scale invasion.

According to Ukraine, the destroyed ship, Caesar Kunikov, would be the 25th disabled Russian vessel.

It also claimed last week that they had disabled about 33 per cent of Russia’s warships, including 24 ships and one submarine.

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Ukraine further released video showing they destroyed the Russian warship in the Black Sea

The footage showed a sea drone racing toward Caesar Kunikov before a heavy smoke rose from the vessel.

The exact number of casualties in the naval war between Ukraine and Russia is not clear, as both sides have different accounts and sources of information.

However, some estimates suggest that hundreds of thousands of people have been killed or wounded in the conflict.

The naval warfare has also caused significant damage to the ships and infrastructure of both countries.

It has also accounted for environmental pollution and disruption of trade and navigation in the Black Sea.

The situation remains tense and volatile, as the international community tries to mediate a peaceful resolution.

In the meantime, Russia’s full-scale invasion of Ukraine is approaching its second anniversary.

The history of Ukraine and Russia relations is long and complex, dating back to the medieval times when both countries emerged from the state of Kyivan Rus.

Since then, Ukraine and Russia have experienced periods of cooperation and conflict, influenced by their geographic, cultural, religious, and political ties and differences.


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